The Effects Of The Global Trade Agreement

We live in a world that is increasingly getting connected. In such a world, trade agreements are bound to expand internationally, and to think and act otherwise would be downright stupid.

These global trade agreements, as such, are either bilateral or multilateral understanding between two or multiple countries and govern the trade policies between them. These agreements have a massive impact on worldwide trade and investments and are one of the major causes responsible for shaping business relationships across the globe. And while such agreements might not affect directly affect the place where you live or operate, being aware of the current trade agreements can definitely uncover numerous opportunities.

Forming up opinions is up to you; we do not intend to initiate an argument over how good or how bad these global trade agreements are. This article aims to get you familiarized with such agreements and tell if your supply chain could be affected or not.

While a few countries have settled upon free trade agreements and are in the process of widening them, a number of other nations have formed common markets and unions; this form of development can a have a thorough effect on small-scale businesses.

Two of the most common agreements are the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) between Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Canada, Brunei, Peru, Mexico, Chile, Malaysia and Japan, and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between Canada, United States and Mexico.

Now, how such agreements impact your local business’s supply chain depends on a simple fact; whether your business is an importer, exporter or neither.

Scenario 1: You neither import nor export

It’s fairly easy to decide whether you are an importer or not, right? I understand that you do not directly source products from a foreign supplier, and technically speaking, that doesn’t make you an importer. However, trade agreements can still impact you. Your suppliers are directly affected by such regulations, and this vulnerability can affect your supply chain.

Keep the distinction in mind.

Scenario 2: You identify yourself as an importer

Owing to the low cost manufacturing in some countries, many small scale suppliers are able to compete with global giants.

With a trade agreement between two countries, most of the times, the country with lower labour costs benefits when the trade tariffs are lowered or eliminated. With trade agreements, importers usually get to source low-cost goods and it allows for the unrestricted movement of such low-cost goods through higher cost partner nation.

In case, such an agreement is dissolved, an importer would inevitably face a higher cost of goods and thus look for cheaper sourcing options, decrease their operational costs, and ultimately increase the prices, which would be borne by the customers, of course.

Scenario 3: You are an exporter

This even counts if you sell products that another firm exports because at some point or other, taxes would be levied on your sold goods. So how does it affect you? Your customers end up paying higher amounts for your products.

With a trade agreement in place between the country where the product originates and the receiving country, the very same products would move through the receiving nation freely. In such cases, you’d definitely want to keep such an agreement intact and leverage this competitive advantage you have in this particular country bound by trade regulations.

As a small or a medium sized business, it is therefore important for you to identify where your business lies with respect to global trade agreements.

The Truth About Shipping Technology and Supply Chain Visibility

In the shipping business, it was once an extra to have shipping technology which supplied supply chain visibility, but it’s become a must in a now competitive and shipping software run industry. Not everyone knows exactly what it means to have complete supply chain visibility, however, so what is supply chain visibility and just how does shipping software help it? You may have learned this stuff about supply chain visibility, so let’s figure out the truth:

Supply chain visibility in a glance

It’s pretty much exactly what it looks like. Utilizing quality shipping software or auditing systems, you’re given awareness over all your shipments through openness of shipping data, organizing, and auditing, and all involved parties gain access to this information: you can plainly view the entirety of your shipments from end to end.

For comprehensive visibility you have to be in a position to trade data around different systems, like shipping data and freight deals to implement the best logistics management strategies you can. How your business and systems connect to your shipping partners along with their system is the number one factor in achieving real visibility so that you can discover how you can save money shipping.

Can a business continue to be competitive without having supply chain visibility?

The quick and candid response would be no. Well, it isn’t really impossible for a shipping business to function without supply chain visibility, but they are more prone to be eliminated or surpassed in the freight or parcel shipping industry by more efficient companies. Merely staying in business differs from being competitive, and supply chain visibility is essential as of late to be able to keep a competitive edge.

Shouldn’t shipping software and visibility be a much more popular strategy?

Unfortunately, a lot of companies aren’t loaded with the proper shipping software and auditing services. Though proper supply chain management and supply chain visibility has been an acknowledged issue for decades, EDIs, manual spreadsheets, etc. aren’t good enough for visibility reliable enough to continue to be competitive. The best supply chain management and visibility option is to use a transportation management system (TMS) and auditing solution.

What does not having visibility mean for a business?

One of the things that can take place is serious damage to a company’s name. About 33% of consumers in the United States put the blame for stock-outs on the store. This gives an adverse influence on long-term consumer retention and brand loyalty. In addition, it will directly injure a company’s bottom line, creating both urgent and extended issues which are hard to remedy.

Where does responsibility for those effects fall?

The real issue ought to be about solving the problem by updating your shipping technology and auditing methods, not setting blame. You can’t position the blame on retailers when 75% of shippers report that their visibility tool doesn’t integrate with their shipping technology, and only 39% of shippers gather data with visibility systems in the first place. There’s just no way to prevent stock-outs without the ability to make radical decisions according to real-time data exchanges.

Approaches to fix the problem

Businesses must find solutions that would provide them with end-to-end supply chain visibility. While legacy systems remain, businesses must invest into transportation management systems and auditing solutions that can operate on both old tech like EDI, and newer technology like API.

API is a wonderful technology for shipping software as a way to join suppliers, shippers, carriers, etc. with real-time transportation data so that they can make better decisions for their logistics management.

You can save money shipping with thorough visibility and improved logistics management, just by embracing more progressive shipping software like a TMS capable of working with both EDI and API.

Shipping TMS delivers transportation software and logistics management services. Transportation industry leading parcel and freight shipping management software helps save money shipping and get cheap shipping rates to improve supply chains.

4 Benefits of Importing Goods From Overseas 4 Benefits of Importing Goods From Overseas

Any business involved in supplying goods or materials needs to constantly look at ways to increase the efficiency of the supply chain, while also managing costs. A practical solution to improve profit margins is to look to the overseas market for the raw materials. Importing goods can offer a variety of worthwhile benefits, such as high-quality goods, lower prices and a wider range of suppliers. While the opportunity to import goods is great for a lot of businesses, it is still essential to conduct the necessary research to avoid making a costly mistake.

Here are a few benefits related to importing from overseas:

Comparative advantage

A major reason to import relates to comparative advantage and the potential to benefit from the more attractively priced goods. Comparative advantage relates to finding the overseas market with the more favorable production costs, such as lower tax schemes, low labor costs, cheaper raw materials, etc. By cutting the initial investment in materials or products, it makes it that much easier to increase future profits once the items are shipped back and sold in your own country. This makes importing one of the easiest and quickest ways to boost your profit margins and cut costs.

High quality products

Importing goods from countries across the world still mean it is possible to source high-quality products. There are plenty of countries that have their own specialties and strengths. For the business that is looking to buy raw materials or goods from a country that specializes in a particular item, it often pays to buy direct from the source. This means it is possible to get access to the finest materials right at the start of the supply chain which should help to improve all-round quality and hopefully make the end product that much more marketable.

Trade relations

There are plenty of countries that attempt to promote trade relations to make it that much easier to import the desired goods or products necessary for your business. Government agencies may even be set up to help make the entire importing process as straightforward as possible. With the guidance of an official agency in place, the risks of trading with an overseas company are likely to be significantly reduced.

Regional resources

A further benefit is the ability to expand the potential market pool with the choice to buy resources that may only be found in specific regions of the world. This may relate to special technologies or raw materials.